STOCKBRIDGE – Six-month-old “Rici” Rodzinski, sporting two teeth, a Berkshire tan and weighing 20 pounds, looks like a future football tackle, but his parents, Dr and Mrs Artur Rodzinski, say he’s more the musician.

The son of the conductor of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, artfully strikes the piano keys, lets himself be lulled by the sound of good music and recently tore in two a few pages of a score sent to his father by a renowned artist. “Rici,” Richard John, whose godfather is Jan Karski, Polish author of “The History of the Secret State,” submitted his first local interview yesterday afternoon, at the spacious farmhouse where the Rodzinskis spent the eight recent summers.

Dr. Rodzinski, intervening, announced that his house was for sale and, raising his large hands, he showed why. Rows of worker calluses mark both palms.

“It takes too long to work the place,” explained the conductor, who does not mind the exercise but cannot serve “two gods”. He devotes more than five hours a day to farming, mowing lawns, repairing roads on the estate and general work.

“I have to get back to my music.”

The Rodzinskis, however, never plan to leave the Berkshires. “The local landscape reminds me of where I grew up in Poland, and the people have been great,” he said. “We’re looking for a place with a nice simple house with a big lot somewhere between Dalton and Windsor. We don’t mind a big place, as long as it’s not elaborate and the elevation is high. But I have to get away from being a farmer,” said Dr Rodzinski. The famous conductor once made a name for himself as a goat herder here, but the animals eventually got his goat. He now has three Thoroughbred cows, two heifers and a good team of horses are for sale.

The Rodzinskis had been married about 10 years before they had “Rici.” Ms Rodzinski, the former Halina Lilpop Wieniawska, great-niece of the famous Polish violinist and composer, said that “Rici’s birth caused a stir and he started getting more publicity than his father”. The chubby baby received gifts from musicians across the country, ranging from toy elephants to a trapeze sitting on top of his crib. On the latter, he works up a huge pair of biceps. “All the muscles too,” beams Dr. Rodzinski.

This story within a story is selected from the archives by Jeannie Maschino, The Berkshire Eagle.